Tag Archives: press

Oscars: Take time to pray for all those in media who really need a prayer

February 24, 2012

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On the occasion of the Academy Awards this weekend, in its parish bulletin St. Therese in Deephaven offered this prayer for the media and entertainment industry:

“Father, in a world deafened by a cacophony of sounds, may all be able to hear your whispering voice. We ask this for all who work in media, the press, radio, television, the internet. May they cherish truth more strongly than their own prejudices and personal agendas. May they present truth in a way that will enlighten hearts rather than inflame passions and conflicts.

“We pray for the artists and musicians of the world. May they utilize their talents to give you glory and in the process receive the recognition that they deserve. May they expose the horror and error of sin and the beauty and truth of virtue. We ask this, Father, in the name of your Son, our divine Master, the Way, the Truth and the Life, who lives and reigns gently with you, and the Holy Spirit, one loving God, forever and ever. Amen.”

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Reporter finds religion covering the sex abuse crisis

October 10, 2011

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A mainstream media reporter came back to the church after covering the clergy sex abuse story?

That sounds ironic, but that’s just what happened with Tom Breen, religion reporter for the Associated Press. Read a fuller account that includes a Q & A with blogger Sarah Pulliam Bailey at http://www.GetReligion.org.

Here’s an appetizer of what you’ll find there. Breen said he began covering religion stories because:

It was not only a fascinating topic, but it was one that not many other reporters were interested in covering, so I could pursue stories without stepping on any toes. I also had tremendously knowledgeable editors who were hungry for religion news. One of them put it to me in a way I’ve always remembered: compare the amount of resources the press spends on covering primary elections, he told me, with the number of people who vote in primary elections. Now compare the resources spent on covering religion with the number of people who attend a weekly worship service.

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