Tag Archives: Lino Rulli

Canonize Lino Rulli? His new book shows how we’re all saints in the making

September 28, 2013

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photoThe Catholic Church calls each and every one of us to answer the call to holiness and strive toward sainthood — even in light of our obvious weaknesses and everyday struggles with sin.

It’s a daunting task for most, but Lino Rulli is up to the challenge. In fact, the St. Paul native and host of Sirius/XM Radio’s “The Catholic Guy” show would like to get there a little faster than the rest of us. In his new book “Saint,” he makes the tongue-in-cheek case for why the Church should canonize him today. (After all, why trust your friends to push your sainthood cause after you die when you can do it yourself?)

In all seriousness, however, the book has a deeper purpose: to encourage you to focus on your spiritual growth and help you “to realize that you might not be as big a sinner as you think, and that, with God’s help, you might just become a saint.”

“Saint” is a follow-up to “Sinner,” Lino’s first book of short, humorous and inspiring stories aimed at encouraging us to live out our faith despite our imperfections. In “Saint,” Lino turns once again to short stories about his life — some funny, some painfully honest, and many with a short nugget of reflection about lessons he learned along the way.

At the end of one story, for example, about an instance when he successfully resisted what can be described as a “temptation of the flesh,” Lino writes: “A saint isn’t someone who has never been tested; a saint is a person who has been tested and, with God’s help, has passed — or, with God’s help, has gotten up the next morning and tried again.”

Saints you can relate to

While Lino was in town yesterday to talk about his book, I asked why he would invest the time and energy to remind people about the call to sainthood. Here’s what he said:

“I guess the reason people like [‘Sinner’] is because a lot of them could relate to it. But, the other side of that coin is the fact that we do need to be reminded that we’re not just a bunch of miserable losers because we fail. For whatever reason, God loves us and we’re still called to holiness. It’s sort of a contradiction in our lives, but it’s the reality of our lives.”

And where can average Joes like myself draw that affirmation and inspiration, other than from Lino and the stories of people who already have a place in the Church’s catalog of saints?

“I get inspired by the average person in church. When I see the mom and dad in church Sunday morning with kids running around like maniacs and you’re going to lose your mind, it inspires me. They don’t have it all together, but they know it would be ten times worse if they didn’t try to go to church. . . . Those are the saints who inspire me: the guy who says I went out Saturday night but I’m still waking up and going to church Sunday morning. Or the single mom. Or even the older people who have their own problems and struggles. I really do look around and I go: We’re all called to be saints, but we’re all saints in the making.”

Chances are future generations won’t be reading about St. Lino in the Church’s official catalog of saints. But he — and the rest of us — should always be striving to be counted eventually among those in heaven.

“Saints” concludes with these wise words:

“Sometimes you chase me, Lord. Sometimes I chase you. But the only time I’ll quit running, the only time I will finally feel at peace, will be when I’m at home with you: there in heaven. That’s when I’ll truly be called a saint.”

Read more about Lino and his new book on his website. You can also order the book from Servant Books.

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Catholics getting ‘consubtantial’ with new Mass language?

December 6, 2011

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There’s material for stand-up comedians in the newly translated Roman Missal, to be sure, but there’s also an opportunity for those humble enough to try to see the chalice as half full.

SiriusXM Radio’s “Catholic Guy,” Lino Rulli joked, “After taking the red eye from LA, I went home and took a nap. I felt consubstantial with my bed. Wow, the new translations are kicking in.”

Personally, I wouldn’t call myself a fan of using terms that aren’t common usage — not if one is striving for understanding — but that’s admittedly from my Bradley University journalism training to strive for clarity and comprehension for the greatest number of readers.

But I ran across Alan Hommerding’s take in his column in AIM, the magazine for music and liturgy planning, and he adds something worthwhile to Catholics’ ongoing conversations/considerations about the new language we’re hearing and saying at Mass now. Here’s an excerpt from “Talking to strangers” in the spring 2012 issue of AIM in which he writes about a talk he gave recently:

“I spoke briefly about the terms ‘consubstantial’ and ‘incarnate’ in the Creed . . . . I observed that it wasn’t at all unreasonable in the context of liturgy — meant to celebrate the mystery of Christ — for folks to learn what those words mean; beyond that, to be catechized about them, and even beyond that, to enter into a mystagogical exploration of these two foundational terms of our Christian faith.

“One attendee raised his hand and shared something from a class . . . . His instructor had been Paul Roche, a translator, classics scholar, and linguist . . . . Roche had told students, ‘For a word to be rich, it must first be strange.’

“For those of us who are followers of Christ, this kind of ‘strangeness’ must intrigue us, leading us to explore the mystery of our salvation in Christ more fully.”

Frankly, the jokes about the new translation are a great release valve allowing venting to happen, and that’s better than explosions, whatever form those might take.

But I’d really be interested in learning deeper, productive thoughts others might have or might have run across that will engage minds and hearts around the new words being prayed at Mass.

The floor is yours.

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Lino Rulli: Take-aways that could be out-takes

September 19, 2011

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"Sinner" is available online at Amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.

  • “I trust in God’s plan, but I’m always afraid I’m going to screw it up.”
  • “Faith and a neurotic personality don’t always mix well.”
  • “I liked the rhythm of monastic life. I liked the structure of prayer and work. I really liked being a part of a community that prayed together, ate together, drank together. It was like a clean frat house.”
  • “Mother Teresa once said that in order to be a saint you have to seriously want to be one. So I try, feebly, to be a saint. Frankly, the sinner in me doesn’t think it sounds like much fun.”
  • “Just a quick note to priests hearing confessions: If confessions start at 5:00 p.m., any chance you could get there a few minutes early, before the line forms? . . . There’s nothing worse than standing in line, waiting for the priest to arrive, and having him show up, stare at each of the people in line, and then go in. Kind of ruins the whole anonymity thing.”
Read a review.
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Catholic Guy cracks jokes and cracks wise over his foibles and his faith

September 19, 2011

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I hate to feed Lino Rulli’s ego, but here  goes: His book “Sinner” had me chuckling out loud.

Fortunately there’s a good dose of humility left in the St. Paul native despite his success in both television and radio. When that’s combined with the self-deprecating humor that he spreads on pretty thickly in stories from his relatively young life-and-times, it makes for reading that’s both funny and — I’m searching for a word here — well, evangelizing? Catechizing without trying too hard? Preaching as much to himself as to others?

Lino is a self-admitted screw up who’s trying not to be.

He’s trying to be a good Catholic, holy, even a saint. He claims to be not doing so well at it, hence the book’s title. You and I might call him normal.

Okay, maybe obsessive.

Definitely gregarious and out-spoken.

Yes, paranoid.

But still funny. And he’d want me to mention that he’s single and still available, ladies.

As he both stumbles along and finds success , the tales he tells are the stuff of sitcoms. The pratfalls are both physical and moral, and that’s where the faith connection comes into play. The stories usually have a punchline, and most have a sliver or two of catechism, too.

Catholic media someone will actually watch & listen to

So that makes “Sinner” not unlike Lino’s “The Catholic Guy” show on SiriusXM Radio afternoons daily, which he tries to make three hours of Catholic radio that doesn’t suck (his description).

That’s what the book is: It’s funny stories that end up being a teaching vehicle about things Catholic that won’t bore you to death or hit you over the head with dogma. The Catholic teaching is there, but it’s a pill that’s not that hard to swallow.

Frankly, the quality of the writing in “Sinner” isn’t unexpected. Lino’s writing talent made the pages of The Catholic Spirit young-adult friendly for a number of years. The “Generation Cross” show that he hosted on Twin Cities cable television aimed, successfully, to be Catholic TV people 18-to-34 would actually watch. His quick wit and his professional know-how around a camera and microphone have been recognized with three Emmys.

Readers of “Sinner” will find themselves appreciating Lino’s dedication to his Catholic faith and his commitment to excellence in his chosen vocation. And they’ll laugh out loud, too.

“Sinner” is available on Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble, via Kindle and audiobook as well.

 

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Catholic Guy of Sirius Radio has book that’s funny before it even starts

September 8, 2011

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You know a book is going to be entertaining when you bust out laughing just reading the page of comments by those puffing for the author — make that allegedly puffing for the author.

The book is “Sinner” by Lino Rulli (Servant Books), and you can read more about it at this link, but get a load of what’s on the page titled “Praise for Lino Rulli”:

  • “A radio host like Howard Stern, only guilt-ridden and confession-going.” — The New York Times
  • “He’s a jerk.” — Ex-girlfriend
  • “Laugh with Lino Rulli and discover why he’s so darned popular.” — Catholic Digest
  • “He owes me fifteen bucks.” — Best friend
  • “He has Letterman’s sharp delivery and Stern’s penchant for pushing boundaries. Yet Lino is also pious.” — St. Anthony Messenger
  • “Lino fights for all sinners, but usually stays bogged down with his own caseload.” — Lino’s personal attorney.
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