Tag Archives: hunting

Sportshow time!

March 27, 2015

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Hopefully, a turkey like this will come into range when it comes time to hunt this spring.

Hopefully, a turkey like this will come into range when it comes time to hunt this spring.

Later today, I will be heading to the Minneapolis Convention Center for the annual Progressive Northwest Sportshow. It’s on my don’t-miss list, and it runs through Sunday.

For hunting and fishing enthusiasts like me, it has a little bit of everything. I always look for booths and products related to my two greatest outdoor passions — bow hunting and turkey hunting. It’s nice to get a nice “fix” of the outdoors as we make the transition from winter to spring. Today being the first official day of spring, it’s the perfect time to go!

There’s lots to cover, and one nice thing is the exercise I get walking from one end of the exhibition hall to the other. Hopefully, that will help get me in shape for the time when I will chase down gobblers this spring. I am hunting in both Minnesota and Wisconsin, plus I will be taking out three other hunters and trying to help them get birds.

One of them is my daughter Claire. We are going to shoot the 20-gauge shotgun she will be using Sunday afternoon, and I am going to buy sights to put on it before we go. She is worried about the recoil, but I hope she won’t be too bothered by it. I’ll be sure to bring some padding for her shoulder. I have taken her three older brothers turkey hunting, and I’m thrilled her time has come. This should be a fun weekend!

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Gorgeous weather triggers big ideas

March 16, 2015

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Something happens when the thermometer rises into the 50s in March. My entire outlook seems to improve. In short, it puts a smile on my face.

And, a few ideas in my head. I acted on one of them last week. For several years, I have been wanting to do some deer scouting and stand placement in the spring. I have read about it, thought about it, dreamed about it. Finally, this year, I did something about it.

I went to the property I bow hunt in Wisconsin and set up two ladder stands, one on either side of a major trail that goes along a ridge and through some thick cover. It is the narrowest funnel on the property, and there is only one trail going through it. So, putting a stand on either side means I can hunt it in any wind. In bow hunting, that’s huge. I did some trimming of shooting lanes, too. I am not quite finished, but will go back in the next few weeks to complete the job. Then, I will be ready to bow hunt this fall.

I have more work to do, and hope to get out again this week. The job was made more difficult by the fact that I lost permission to hunt on a great metro property after two guys with a lot of money leased it for the year. I may get back on again someday, but for now, I am required to go out and remove my three stands. I did that, and put two of those stands up in Wisconsin.

I also have been thinking and planning for turkey hunting this spring. I will be taking my daughter Claire during the first season, and I am very excited about that. It will be her very first hunt. She told me a few weeks ago she wants to go, but still isn’t sure she will be able to pull the trigger on a bird. That’s fine with me. I just look forward to the opportunity to take her out into the woods.

I will hunt Season E in Minnesota (May 5-9), then the D Season in Wisconsin, which begins May 6. That has been a great time period to hunt, and I hope it will be again this year.

Sure would be nice to do some fishing, too. I met someone who lives on Big Stone Lake, which lies on the border of Minnesota and South Dakota. That lake is open year round, so I could go out there any time after the ice melts. I may get in touch with him to see if that will work. I also know that the Bishop’s Charity Fishing Tournament for the Diocese of Sioux Falls will be in June, so I could go out there for that event. I’m sure I could both fish the tournament and cover it. That would be fun, plus I could take home some walleyes for a fish fry.

The biggest challenge, as always, is time. Life gets very busy in May, so it could get tough to squeeze in some outdoor outings. But, June is looking pretty good right now. I would like to get out on the water at some point. Big Stone is about a 3-hour drive, which isn’t too bad. If there is a boat waiting for me there to go out in, it will be hard to pass up.

For now, I’ll work on the deer stands and start looking for strutting toms as I drive around. The mild winter should mean plenty of birds this spring. Even after our harsh winter last year, I still saw quite a few, and was able to harvest three mature gobblers. I plan to have three tags again this year, maybe four. Plus, I may try to get a bird with my bow this year. I’m going back and forth on that one. I will do some more checking into that. Sure would be fun to take a tom with my bow.

What’s fun right now is letting the warm weather fuel my dreams!

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Best archer in the world?

January 26, 2015

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My son Joe sent me a video that is absolutely amazing. It features archer Lars Andersen from Denmark and the amazing things he can do with a bow. I have watched it twice now, and it is nothing short of astounding.

In the video, he was able to fire three arrows in .6 second. And, he can hit moving objects, and hit objects while he’s moving. I kept looking for some evidence that the video is fake or doctored, but couldn’t find any. I also did a brief Google search on Andersen. Seems like he’s been around for a few years and established a reputation as a skilled archer. I think his new video has 4 million hits!

I know I won’t ever come close to being as good as he is. That is part of what makes me have so much respect for him. Even with a compound bow, archery is hard, at least for me. But, even when my arrows are a little off target during practice, I simply remind myself that my goal is to put an arrow through the vitals of a deer — about the size of a paper plate.

If I can do that when a deer I want to shoot walks by, it’s all good!

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Winter: A time for preparation

January 14, 2015

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Unless you like to go ice fishing or coyote hunting, winter is the off season for outdoor pursuits. But, that doesn’t mean your only option is to sit idle and dream about the big fish you’ll catch once the ice thaws, or the big tom you’ll harvest after the snow melts.

Far from it. This can be an important time for getting ready for upcoming fishing and hunting seasons. Just today, I took an important step toward what I hope will be a productive bow hunting season in the fall. I went to A1 Archery in Hudson, Wis. to have the guys there do some work on my bow. I am having a new string put on, plus a new sight.

This is a great time of year for that. First, most shops aren’t so busy, and thus have the time to help you and get the work done right. Second, it gives you plenty of time after getting the bow back to make sure it’s functioning properly. With archery, so many little things can go wrong, and almost any of them can cost you a deer in the fall. Now’s the time to get on top of equipment issues.

This is also a time to do research on new gear you’re interested in trying. Thankfully, I did my research two years ago on strings, and settled on Vapor Trail. Actually, the guys at A1 highly recommended this string, and the research I did online confirmed that this is a great product. I had one put on my bow at A1 two years ago and it has worked great for me. I have harvested three deer with this string, and I am very happy with the results.

One good thing about an archery shop like A1 is that they know good products and feel confident recommending them. The guys who work there are bow hunters, plus they talk to many bow hunters who come through the doors. If a product isn’t good, they’ll find out about it and will not recommend it to people like me.

That’s why I quickly took their advice in November and got Beaman arrows and NAP Killzone broadheads. I didn’t regret it. The very next day, I shot a doe with one of them, taking a steep quartering away shot that hit the mark and caused the doe to fall at less than 100 yards. A week later, I took another doe with a perfect double-lung pass through at 15 yards. She went only about 60 yards, and I saw her fall. I’m sold on them and plan to use them next year.

With all of these great experiences under my belt, I was confident when the guys at A1 recommended a one-pin sight by HHA Sports. After using a four-pin sight since buying my bow, I decided a one-pin was the way to go, primarily because almost all of the shots I take are less than 30 yards. My friend and bow hunting mentor, Steve Huettl, has shot several trophy bucks, all of them at 30 yards or less. He says he likes to keep his shots short because lots of things can go wrong on longer shots. The way I figure, if a guy like him who’s a much better shot than me doesn’t take long shots, I shouldn’t, either.

Thus, only one sight pin would be needed if I decide to keep my shots under 30 yards. There’s very little difference in point of impact from 5 to 25 yards, no more an 2 inches. So, only one pin is needed to shoot in that distance range. Having this sight will keep my sight picture uncluttered and simplify the process — I will never accidentally use the wrong pin.

The nice thing about A1 is the guys in the shop will install the new string and cables, mount the new sight and paper tune my bow. All I’ll have to do is sight it in, which I will be able to do in their indoor range. Then, I’ll have several months of shooting until the next hunting opportunity — spring turkey season. I have an opportunity to bow hunt a property in Wisconsin where I bow hunted for deer this fall. Not sure if I’ll do it, as a turkey is a much smaller target than a deer. But, I might give it a try. These will be unpressured birds, so I may have a better chance at luring them in close. I would want a bird to be no farther than 20 yards away, with 10 being much prefered. I’ll admit, it sure would be a great achivement to get a gobbler with a bow. We’ll see what I think come May.

More tips

Speaking of turkey hunting, here’s another thing you can do this winter — get landowner permission to hunt. In some cases, it’s merely a matter of picking up the phone and calling people who have let you hunt in past years. In other cases, it may be calling someone for the first time. In that case, I like to get on the phone as early as possible. Waiting runs the risk of somebody beating you to it. Plus, landowners may well be friendlier during one of the first calls they get from a hunter. Some landowners get lots of calls every year, and I wonder if they get tired of them after a while. Right about now is when I get on the phone, and the results have been great over the years.

It’s looking like I may be taking my 12-year-old daughter Claire out turkey hunting for the first time. She has expressed interest, and insists that she will go if I offer to take her. However, she is reluctant to miss school, and reluctant to get up early. Rising well before dawn is a fact of life for turkey hunters, as the most gobbling of the day starts right before sunrise. It’s a nice treat for any turkey hunter, but especially beginners. Maybe I can talk Claire into getting up early just once. But, like her mother, she is NOT a morning person. So, we’ll see.

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Having fun hunting and scouting

December 15, 2014

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I have visited the property I bow hunt in Wisconsin twice over the last three days. I hunted there Friday morning, and did a little scouting yesterday afternoon.

I did not see a deer on Friday, but I did have the chance to take a brief walk in the woods before heading in to the office. I did some more walking on the property yesterday, after I was done doing some volunteer work at the Christmas tree farm owned by Charlie MacDonald.

The number of visitors went down later in the afternoon, so Charlie let me go with a good chunk of daylight left. Immediately, I headed to the ridge I had been hunting all fall. I checked the trail that goes by my stand and saw several piles of deer droppings, so I know deer are still using the area.

Then, I started walking along the ridge to do some scouting. I was looking for deer trails, funnels and good spots to put up stands. I walked around quite a bit, then picked a spot that I think looks good. Here’s what I liked:

1. It is a place where the terrain necks down (funnel)

2. It also contains the thickest cover I saw on the ridge

3. There is only one trail going through it

4. I found good trees on either side of the trail for putting up stands

5. With two stands up, I can hunt in any wind direction

The problem I have been having is finding a funnel area where deer have to come through. There just isn’t one on this property, as there is a bench down the hill from where the woods begin. Even on the spot I just described, there is a flat bench down below me that deer likely use. But, that bench is very open, and the cover is not nearly as thick as the spot I want to hunt.

That’s important, as deer really like to be in and around thick cover. And, once the leaves drop, the cover thins out everywhere. If you can find a spot where it’s still thick, that’s a spot worth hunting. If it’s in a funnel area where you can cover the width of a funnel with a bow shot (25 yards or less in my case), then you’ve really got something.

That’s exactly what I have here. Even though I won’t be able to cover the bench down below this spot, I know that deer will move through the heavy cover in this spot. There was a clearly defined deer trail through it, with some droppings to verify that deer were traveling there.

Another thing I like about hunting heavy cover is that I think you are less likely to spook deer as they come through. First — and very important —the deer can’t see you from a long ways away. Second, they feel more comfortable in cover and are less likely to be on high alert as they travel through it. And third, all the cover helps the hunter blend in more and avoid sticking out like a sore thumb.

Of course, I’ll have to be alert at all times because deer won’t be visible until they’re close. Plus, the heavy cover will restrict my shooting lanes even if I do a good amount of trimming.

But, that’s OK. The truth is, in bow hunting, there always are tradeoffs. So, what you need to do is take advantage of every asset, and do your best to limit the liabilities.

In other words, simplify the process. That’s what I’m doing here. I will set up two stands to hunt one trail. The nice thing is, I will set up each stand so that I will have a 15-yard shot to my left, which means I can take the shot while sitting down. That will keep my movements to a minimum, which is very important in bow hunting. I’ll just need to grab my bow, quietly lift it off the bow hanger, draw and shoot.

I plan on cutting two shooting lanes for each stand so that I can draw and shoot once the deer gets slightly past me, no matter which way it is coming down the trail. That gives me a slightly quartering away shot, which is ideal, plus it gets me out of the deer’s field of vision. I have killed all three of my archery deer with that type of shot, and none of them saw me draw.

I hope to get the two stands set up sometime between now and when the woods “green up.” Then, I can leave them alone for several months until archery season begins.

I never envisioned that bow hunting would be a year-round affair, but I am starting to realize the importance of doing stuff throughout the year. Already, I shoot year round to keep my arm and shoulder muscles in shape. So, doing a little work on stands doesn’t seem like a big deal.

Hopefully, putting up stands during the winter and early spring will help build anticipation for the upcoming bow season.

 

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Bow hunting lessons learned

December 3, 2014

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With the archery hunting season nearing the end, I thought now would be a good time to offer some of the important lessons I learned this season. Unfortunately, they come as a result of failures. I always say that bow hunting is a very tough sport that punishes even the smallest mistakes. Hopefully, these lessons will help you avoid the same mistakes I made.

1. Take your time when shooting. My friend Steve Huettl reminded me of this important lesson several times this fall, usually right after I rushed a shot and either missed a deer or hit it in the wrong spot. On the other hand, on two instances, I took the time to settle the pin on the right spot and execute a smooth release, which resulted in two does harvested. I have had a tendency to shoot quickly ever since I started bow hunting, so it’s a hard habit to break. But, it’s important that I do. The two times I was able to do it this fall will help me next year.

2. Dress to stay warm in the stand. Despite a colder-than-normal November, I managed to stay warm in my stands this year. I have developed a system that seems to work very well. Important components are: 1. layering, starting with a base layer of Under Armour cold weather underwear; 2. a muff to keep my hands warm, which is a critical part of bow hunting; 3. hand warmer packets to put inside the muff — they really work; 4. a thin balaclava for my head and neck, and a really warm hat for colder days (I use one called a Mad Bomber, which uses real rabbit fur); 5. warm boots (I use Muck Arctic Pro boots, which are insulated rubber boots); and 6. insulated bibs underneath a heavy, insulated parka. I think I had the ultimate test this year, and held up well. So, I have no worries about keeping warm in November.

3. Be careful when attempting to call. Twice, I decided to use calling to try and lure in a buck. Both times, I did not have a deer in sight when I tried it, and both times, it worked — kind of. I had bucks come to within bow range, but did not take a shot either time. What happened on both occasions is that a small buck came walking in straight at me very cautiously and with its head up. That made it impossible to draw. What was happening, I believe, is that both bucks were looking for the source of the calling and were trying to see the deer that made the sound. In one case, I used a grunt call. In another, I used a doe bleat call. I think the most effective way to use calls is to have a deer decoy set up, so that when a buck comes in, there will be a decoy to draw him in. Plus, if you position the decoy in a certain way, it helps you be able to get the buck in the right position for a shot. That’s something I may try next year.

4. Nothing beats funnels. Steve has continually stressed the importance of this, and one of my does came as a result of setting up on a nice pinch point. Not only was I set up on a narrow strip of woods between two areas of tall, marshy grass, but there was a large fallen tree that funneled deer right past my stand. A doe walked past my stand at about 10 yards, then turned straight away from me just as I was getting ready to draw. Fortunately, that move caused her to be facing the downed tree. Therefore, I knew it was just a matter of time before she had to turn to the right to walk around the tree. That’s exactly what she did, offering a quartering away shot. I put the arrow right where it needed to go, and she went only about 80 to 100 yards before falling.

5. Do scouting when the leaves are down. I believe this is the key to knowing how the woods look in November during the rut. It tells you two things: 1. What kind of shooting lanes you really have; and 2. What are the remaining thicker areas where deer feel secure. In September, it’s thick everywhere because of the foliage, so deer can bed down and hang out just about anywhere and feel safe. Once the leaves are down, the woods are far more open and, sometimes, thicker areas are at a premium. If you can find them, it’s good to hunt them. I like to find trails leading from the thicker areas. The best scenario is that, because of a funnel, there is only one trail the deer are using. That is literally a gold mine. Does like to bed in thicker areas, and bucks like to hang out in them to wait for does or look for them. A friend hunted near an area like this and heard deer moving around in it for the first hour or two of a morning hunt. Then, a doe came busting out of the thicket with a nice 10-point buck trailing her. He shot the buck at almost point-blank range after the doe whisked by his stand.

6. Never be satisfied. Although I had success in the woods this year, I know I can do better next year. It’s that mindset that had me out in the woods scouting over the weekend, and resulted in finding a new spot for next year. I went to an area of the property I hadn’t spent much time in, and found a new spot that looks absolutely dynamite. It features a funnel that comes off of a corn field. The trail the deer were using was absolutely beaten down with tracks. In fact, it was the most deer sign I have ever seen on this property. In addition to tracks, there was fresh deer droppings all over, indicating the deer are spending lots of time here. I plan on being there next fall to greet them.

7. Get out in the woods in the spring. I plan on going back to this new spot in late March or early April, and getting a stand ready. I may even go sooner, especially if it warms up later this month like the weather experts are predicting. Then, I can not only put the stand up, but cut shooting lanes and put trail tacks up so I can find my way to the stand in the dark. Then, the stand will sit there for months, allowing the deer to get used to it. Hopefully, they’ll be relaxed when they walk past it next fall while I’m sitting in it.

I’ve heard some people call bow hunting a year-round endeavor. I always thought that was strange and a bit excessive, but I think I’m slowly becoming part of that crowd (my wife uses the term “obsession” more and more these days). I’m realizing that this kind of effort is what it takes to be consistently successful. I have come to one simple conclusion — bow hunting is VERY hard. For me, it’s huge to get any deer with a bow. My goal now is to be consistently successful. The good news is, I have done a lot of work already, so I’m merely doing a few more things, like setting up a new stand. I have gotten pretty good at stand setup, so this doesn’t bother me at all. In fact, it’s fun, despite the hard work involved.

I’m hoping it will pay dividends next fall. I still don’t consider myself a trophy hunter, but I’m starting to like the idea of trying for at least a nice buck. I shot a buck last fall with a very small 8-point rack, and I would sure like to get something bigger next fall. I think that’s a realistic goal. Who knows? Maybe something really nice will come walking by.

I’ll be waiting.

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A time for waiting . . . and thanksgiving

December 1, 2014

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Father Michael Becker, rector of St. John Vianney College Seminary in St. Paul, poses for a picture with his 10-point buck.

Father Michael Becker, rector of St. John Vianney College Seminary in St. Paul, poses for a picture with his 10-point buck.

As we make the transition from Thanksgiving season to Advent, I offer a story that combines both — offering thanks to God and waiting for his blessing. It comes from Father Michael Becker, rector of St. John Vianney College Seminary in St. Paul and avid deer hunter. In his own words:

“The first weekend of deer hunting opener, I was stationed in a stand one hour west of Bemidji. I saw a total of 10 small 1-year-old deer at different moments in the morning and late afternoon.  The party I hunt with abides by the rule that one never shoots a buck with less than eight points on a full rack, so that the young bucks can grow, and one never shoots a yearling unless you want to be made fun of.

About fifteen minutes after sunset, I decided that I would get on my knees and thank God for the beauty of his creation — the sun, the moon and the stars, the vegetation, the snow on the ground, and all these 1-year old small deer frolicking around the tree line.

It was not but thirty seconds after I knelt down and offered my thanks to God that a larger 2-year-old fork buck trotted past my stand. I saw it head toward the woods 40 yards to my east, and watched it elegantly scope out the territory before heading into the woods.

As I am a guest on Jerry and Bitsy Dehmer’s land, I abide by the same rules they follow, which is again not to shoot any bucks with less than full racks, but to let them grow to full stature. Suddenly, the fork buck took off running at high speed away from the woods. I thought, ‘Wow, there must be a bigger buck in that woods claiming the territory and chasing him away.’

So, I lifted my rifle and got in place, ready to shoot. The next sight was stunning. I watched a 200-pound black bear climb a tree on the edge of the forest like a monkey. I was in awe at how fast it ascended and descended, and realized, ‘One trying to escape a black bear by climbing a tree would never make it.’

Then, it climbed a second tree. I’m not sure what it was looking for, as the trees were barren, but the sight left me in awe. I continued to thank God for his small and great gifts of love.

The second day followed a cold storm, which lifted about midnight, leaving a very bright moon to shine on the landscape. As a result, most deer were out feeding in the night, and no one saw deer in the morning’s hunt. At dusk Sunday evening — and, mind you, I had celebrated Mass the evening before with the whole Dehmer clan — we all went out to our stands, and I took the stand on what is called, ‘Machinery Hill,’ as a few old combining pieces rest on the 15-foot hill overlooking a patch of corn and beans.

Jerry Dehmer, the grandfather and owner of the land, instructed me to go to Machinery Hill because there was more food left in that area for the deer to graze. Internally I wondered, ‘Maybe I should go to another stand in which no one has yet sat,’ but this little interior voice told me, ‘Trust Jerry’s advice.’

You see, Jerry has been hunting and trapping since he was 8 years old. For much of his youth he trapped fox and skunk, selling the hides for money. He is an expert huntsman, who has shot many whitetail deer, elk, antelope, etc. So, I trusted Jerry and went to his recommended stand. One other thing about Jerry and his family: No matter how good the hunt, one always gets out of his stand on Sunday to go to church!

Now sunset was judged to be 4:46 p.m. that evening; thus the final minute to shoot would be 5:16 p.m., which is one half hour after sunset. As in the first day, I saw only small yearlings, but this time 13 of them in different packs. They were cute and playful.

About the last 10 minutes of my hunt, because I could not go out on the second weekend, I decided again to simply thank God for all his gifts of love, in creation, in prayer, in the Sacraments, in the Scriptures, in my family and in friends like the Dehmers, in my vocation as a Catholic priest, and in these 13 small deer who scampered around 20 yards from my stand.

As soon as I completed my prayer of thanksgiving, sure enough, this large buck comes strutting out of the woods. It chased some of the yearlings, only to discover they were not ready for mating, then left a large scrape on the ground under a twig, into which it pressed its facial gland, leaving notice to any does in heat.

Sighting the buck in my scope, I recognized the antlers widened beyond the ears, revealing it to be a fully mature male whitetail deer. My first shot was over the buck, highly unusual for me, but the sound the bullet made in the woods behind him confused his judgment, and thus he stood for another second trying to get his bearings. This gave me the opportunity to lower the rifle and put a bullet through the heart. Upon retrieval, I found that it was a 10-point buck with a beautiful, full body. God is good to the grateful man!”

Congratulations go to Father Becker! I’m sure that made quite a story for dozens of seminarians at SJV. We’ll have to see if that buck makes it to the wall of his office. If it does, it will join two other handsome buck mounts already there.

I think my strategy for next year should include asking Father Becker to bless all of my deer hunting gear, especially my bow and my gun!

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Wisconsin farm is home to both deer and Christmas trees

November 24, 2014

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I went out yesterday to a property I have been bow hunting in Wisconsin. It’s where I got a nice doe on Nov. 12.

When I arrived around 11 a.m. to do some scouting, the property was abuzz with activity. No, it wasn’t hunters dressed in blaze orange out for the firearms deer opener in Wisconsin, which was the day before. Rather, it was people hunting for something different — Christmas trees.

The place I hunt is actually a Christmas tree farm called Mr. Snowman’s Christmas Tree Farm, located a few miles north of Prescott (address is N 7619 1250th St., River Falls, Wis. 54022; 715-262-3999). It’s owned by a charming and friendly older gentleman named Dr. Charlie MacDonald, a retired physician and father of Kathy Schneeman, former respect life coordinator for the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis and mother of nine. I met Kathy years ago and always enjoy the chance to cross paths with her.

She put me in touch with her dad several years ago and he invited me to bow hunt for deer on his property, which I finally decided to do this year. He does not allow gun hunting, as the opening of the Wisconsin firearms season coincides with the start of his annual tree sale.

Fine with me. I really enjoy bow hunting, and I greatly looked forward to hunting his property this year. There is another hunter on the property named Al, who is in his 70s and has been hunting the property for about the last 10 years. He talked glowingly about the good deer hunting on this property.

Turns out, Al was right on. He helped me set up a stand that was right between two major deer trails. Starting in early November, I sat there six times in a row and not only saw deer each time, but had at least one within bow range (less than 30 yards for me) all six times. On the seventh try, I did not see a deer. But, I went out again Friday afternoon and saw a deer in the last 15 minutes.

It was a small buck, and his antlers looked a lot like the ones on a buck I had missed earlier. I rushed a shot I didn’t need to rush, and I think the string hit my jacket because my arrow went about 3 feet left of where I was aiming and missed the deer entirely. That’s the way bow hunting goes sometimes, and that is part of the appeal, as I am learning. This time around, the buck stopped at 20 yards and was facing me while partially obstructed by a tree. He never offered a shot and eventually trotted off.

I hope to get out and hunt this week, then I will be out at the farm this Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to work there. That’s part of Charlie’s agreement with those who hunt on his farm. I am happy to oblige.

And, I sincerely hope those reading this will pay a visit to Charlie’s farm to pick out their tree. It’s a beautiful piece of property, and it’s very close to the Twin Cities. It takes me only about 35 minutes to get there from my home in St. Paul. If you come on Sunday, I’ll be the one helping you load up your tree. There are lots of trees left, and the experience to go to a tree farm to pick out your own tree is priceless. And, if you go, be sure to take a walk around his gift shop for more Christmas decorations, including wreaths.

See you Sunday!

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Venison summer sausage: an annual tradition

November 18, 2014

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Yesterday, I made a detour on my route home from work to stop in at Stasny’s Food Market on Western Avenue in St. Paul.

I always love going there, and usually it’s for one of two reasons: 1. To drop off deer for processing; and, 2. To pick up venison that has been processed.

Yesterday, it was the latter. I picked up one of the does I shot with my bow. Along with the meat, I got what everyone in my family loves: venison summer sausage.

I immediately cut open a stick when I got home, and wasted no time sharing it with members of my family. We all started scarfing it down, and almost went through a whole stick. I asked my wife how she rated it on a scale of 1 to 10. Without hesitation, she exclaimed, “10!”

We all agreed. There just was no flaw in this delicious appetizer. In fact, my wife said she would have been fine to have it as the main course for dinner. Too bad she didn’t say this before I fired up the charcoal grill to make pork chops. I gladly would have feasted on cheese, crackers and venison summer sausage.

Oh well. We can do that some other night. We’ve got plenty of sausage left, which I will share with others. One of my traditions is to stop by homes of landowners whose land we hunt and give them a stick of summer sausage right before Christmas. They seem to appreciate it. One of them says he looks forward to it every year. Well, he will get some this year, and I’m very glad to swing by and hand it to him in person.

There’s lot of good eating ahead. I plan to make venison meatloaf for my co-w0rkers later this week at a potluck. Of course, I plan to be near the head of the food line!

 

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More deer hunting success!

November 14, 2014

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This nice doe walked by the stand at 11 a.m. on a cold, crisp day.

This nice doe walked by the stand at 11 a.m. on a cold, crisp day.

I had an amazing day in the woods on Wednesday. I went bow hunting in the morning in Wisconsin, then gun hunting in Minnesota with my friend Bernie Schwab in the afternoon. It was COLD. When I got out there in the morning, it was 16 degrees.

I didn’t get up in my bow stand until after shooting light, but there was no way I was going to climb in earlier in that cold. I was planning to be there until at least 1 p.m. or until I got a deer, so I didn’t want to get there early and risk getting chilled. I ended up waiting in the stand for four hours, then caught movement through the brush at 11.

I stood up and grabbed my bow,  then a doe came out right on a trail 15 yards from me. It’s the same trail the small buck came through the week before that I had missed. She was walking nice and slow with her head down. As she approached the spot where I wanted to shoot, I drew back. She got there and stopped, just like I wanted her to. I anchored the pin right behind her shoulder and made sure it wasn’t too far back, which is the mistake I had made just two days earlier. I executed a nice, smooth release and the arrow hit right where I aimed.

With the lighted nock, I saw the arrow hit right behind her shoulder, and it passed through. I heard the thump, then she jumped and started running. I knew the hit was good. She went about 60 yards, then slowed down and wobbled. She darted a little more, and fell over and died. It took less than 10 seconds, and it was the first time I have ever seen a deer fall that I hit with an arrow.

Unfortunately, I was so focused on her that I didn’t notice the small buck following her right down the same trail. By the time I turned around and saw him, he was coming into the clearing. I tried to grab another arrow, but he saw me and veered off. Then, another small buck came from a different direction and the two bucks were milling around for a few minutes before walking off. Very cool.

Just for kicks, I went to the blood trail and tracked it to the deer. A 5-year-old could have followed it. When you get a shot in the right place, an arrow can kill a deer just as fast and effectively as a gun. I registered the deer, took it into a processor in Prescott called Ptacek’s, then went down to Red Wing to hunt with Bernie.

He had been out that morning with the landowner and they got a nice 10-point buck that the landowner took in to a butcher to get made into his favorite venison treat — jalapeno sticks. So, it was time to get a deer for Bernie.

I climbed into a stand that had been productive, and began the wait. I saw a doe out feeding about 200 yards away, and hoped it would come my way. Instead, she went back into the woods after about 15 minutes.

Things were quiet until about a half hour of shooting light remained. Then, I heard movement behind me to the right in the woods. In a matter of seconds, I spotted a deer walking in the woods behind me very close. It swung around to my left and turned to go into the field. I got a good look at its head and body, and saw no antlers. We had antlerless tags left, so I was good to go. When the deer stepped out into the field at about 15 yards, I fired. The shot hit low, which meant the deer didn’t die right away. I had to go after it and make a finishing shot, which I did.

Here’s the great part — the landowner came out with his truck to pick up the deer, then invited us in for soup and hot chocolate. Can’t beat that!

We have been very blessed to hunt this property. We have killed some nice deer there, including a pair of 10-pointers Bernie and I shot there two years ago. Bernie’s son Dan got his first deer there, too, and my son Andy shot his first Minnesota deer there last year. Andy got another doe there this year, and my brother Paul got a deer, too, on a different property on opening day.

All in all, a great deer season, and it’s not done for me. I still have two archery tags left for Wisconsin, including my buck tag. I think I will wait until the weather warms up later next week, then try again. I would like to get a deer for some friends who don’t have one yet. I was able to give a deer to Bernie last year that we got in Montana, and I would like to help someone out again this year. With the deer herd down in Minnesota, things have been tough for hunters overall.

I think part of the reason for our success is we’re hunting properties we’ve hunted before and have stands set up in good spots. From what I can tell, the area we hunt seems to have plenty of deer, and I’m hearing the same thing from other hunters there.

It will be interesting to see what the DNR does with the deer limits. All indications are that they will relax the restrictions at least somewhat. I’m optimistic the herd will bounce back. For now, I’m counting my blessings and thanking the Lord for another great deer season!

 

 

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