Tag Archives: goodness

God is found where these three elements meet

October 26, 2012

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Only in beauty is truth good, and goodness true. Photo/Temari 09 Licensed under Creative Commons

Truth, Goodness and Beauty.

If this were the title of an HBO miniseries I’m not sure it would be a hit. I wonder if many people would watch more than one episode of a show without crime, sex, lying or death.

Unfortunately, living in this Culture of Death we’re not attuned to fully recognize and appreciate truth, goodness and beauty, which are among the chief attributes of God. In fact, God can be found where these three qualities meet.

Called “God’s three great prophets in the human soul” by philosopher  Peter Kreeft, truth, goodness and beauty go way back in history to Judaism, Christian and Greek philosophy and pagan myth-makers. Dr. Kreeft writes:

 Beauty is known by the imagination; goodness, by conscience; and truth, by reason (in the large, ancient sense of wisdom, not just cleverness; understanding, not just calculation; reason, not just reasoning).

Closer to God

The more we seek truth, goodness and beauty in the Lord, the godlier we become. All that’s true, beautiful and good will grow if it is conformed to God, Pope Leo XIII wrote.

The three attributes have a lot to do with each other, as the Catechism points out:

 The practice of goodness is accompanied by spontaneous spiritual joy and moral beauty. Likewise, truth carries with it the joy and splendor of spiritual beauty. Truth is beautiful in itself. (CCC2500)

According to speaker and author Christopher West, beauty can lead us to goodness and truth:

 As Pope Benedict XVI says, when we allow beauty to pierce our hearts, it awakens in us our deepest desires, our desire for the Infinite.  Beauty has the ability to seize our hearts and transform us from within.

That’s what West had in mind when he and others began developing Fill These Hearts: God, Sex and the Universal Longing, a performance revealing–through the beauty of art–truth and goodness about human sexuality as found in Bl. Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body.

Revealing Theology of the Body through Beauty

West, indie-folk band Mike Mangione and the Union and sand artist David Leiberg are bringing Fill These Hearts in spoken word, music and art to the University of St. Thomas’s O’Shaunessy Education Center auditorium in St. Paul, Minn., this Saturday night, Oct. 27.

The idea for the event, which is more theater than lecture, came out of Pope John Paul’s Letter to Artists and a desire to make Theology of the Body themes “contemplatively present in color, shape, and sound.” It is produced by the Cor Project, a team dedicated to sharing TOB.

Art can open us to beauty, which can “seize our hearts and transform us from within,” West said. “That’s our hope for this event in a nutshell, to lead people along the way of beauty.”

Beauty, truth and goodness are essentially Love in its full cosmic and personal meaning–which is the Glory of God, according to theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar.  Only in beauty is truth good, and goodness true, he writes.

If you’re looking for something true, good and beautiful this Saturday night, HBO probably isn’t your best bet—there’s a boxing match on. But you’ll find in the unique sensory experience of  Fill These Hearts, the Lord in His truth, goodness and beauty.

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If God hired an ad agency…

October 6, 2008

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“The Happy Soul Industry,”
by Steffan Postaer

“People are not responding to the message anymore,” God tells an angel named David. The old stuff — burning bushes, parting waters, changing water into wine — aren’t working anymore. God’s looking for a new and different approach.

“In order to inspire goodness we’ve got to improve our image,” God says. “We need better copy!”

Her answer (yes, God is a she in this novel): Hire an advertising agency.

With that as a great jumping off point for the plot, author Steffan Postaer mines his knowledge of the ad biz to create a fairly interesting story with characters that readers will care about.

That is, if readers can get past the soft-porn.

David the angel gets sent down to earth to find an ad agency to “market heaven,” bumps into a beautiful woman and has sex with her the very first evening. (Is this really the way “dating” happens today? Is it art reflecting life, or does art justify — give permission to — dismissal of the virtuous life?)

And although the sex is admittedly an element of the plot, the scene does get pornographic. As do other scenes later on. They’re unnecessary and offensive. Some, too, will be offended by the language. I’m sure the crude language does reflect reality, though, and it shouldn’t be a deal breaker.

What just happen here?

What is a deal breaker, though, is that Postaer develops a handful of characters, gets us involved with them, works them into the plot and subplots, and then you find yourself asking, hey, what just happened there?

The ad exec with the overactive libido suddenly gets transformed into a caring, sensitive male. His ex-wife turns from witch to a do-gooder. The creative genius at the ad agency goes from workaholic to father-of-the-year.

But we never find out why. And Postaer never quite brings all the subplot elements together. Still, he does a pretty good job of leading us to what looks like it’ll be an engaging final scene.

I won’t ruin the ending for you, but the Greeks who invented “deus ex machina” have nothing on Steffan Postaer.

Greek tragedies aside, “The Happy Soul Industry” has worthwhile lessons to share about life and faith and virtue and marketing — if you choose to get past the offensive passages. And Postaer, a successful ad copywriter who runs Euro RSCG Chicago now, has a thought-provoking idea for an ad campaign to promote goodness to the American people. Think this would work? Picture billboards at bus stops and train platforms with messages like:

“These days, everybody’s skipping prayer.

So, how’s everybody doing?”


The insider peek into the advertising world is worked in creatively, and Postaer has a great touch with humor. It’s good writing and good reading. The pity is that this could have been a really good novel with just a bit more work on the ending and a tad less bowing to the convention that sex sells. But I guess we know where that comes from. — bz

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