Tag Archives: Fish

St. Edward fish fry raises funds for youth group trip

March 17, 2016

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sted

St. Edward’s youth served up a plate of two piping hot deep-fried fish portions, together with crinkle cut fries, a simple salad, cole slaw, and dessert and a beverage. Creamy Mac and Cheese was available as a sub for the non-fishmongers among us, but better yet, they brought out the malt vinegar, a staple for the fish and chips purists among us. Courtesy Fish Daddy

Catholic Hotdish offers another review from Fish Daddy, who visits some of the hot spots in the Twin Cities for Lenten fish fries. He’s looking at more than the fish — it’s the fellowship, the friendliness and faith that makes this Catholic Lenten tradition shine.

Nestled in a quiet neighborhood in Bloomington is St. Edward’s. They don’t pull out the deep fryers every week in Lent like some of the previous parishes Fish Daddy visited. In fact, if you’re looking for a recommendation to visit St. Edward’s Fish Fry, you’ll actually have to wait until next year. But the event raised awareness and funds for a unique summer experience for the active St. Edward’s youth group.

Fish

St. Edward’s youth served up a plate of two piping hot deep-fried fish portions, together with crinkle cut fries, a simple salad, cole slaw, and dessert and a beverage. Creamy Mac and Cheese was available as a sub for the non-fishmongers among us, but better yet, they brought out the malt vinegar, a staple for the fish and chips purists among us. (2 fish)

Service

A hearty welcome at the entrance table, along with plenty of table service here, from the coffee and beverage refillers to the plate clearers. And St. Ed’s also had a nice guitar accompaniment with dinner, compliments of the youth group. And if you feel the need to sneak back for that second cookie or delicious slice of cake at the dessert table, you weren’t the only one. (3 fish)

Fishers of people

There are plenty of Lenten offerings at the church of St. Edward’s, from the post-food Stations of the Cross, to rosaries on Monday evenings and Potluck and Palm Braiding on Wednesday March 16. Visit their website to find out what’s going on for Holy Week, too.

The St. Edward’s youth group was well on their way to raising funds for their trip to Heifer Ranch in Perrysville, Arkansas. There, they will learn about sustainable solutions for hunger, poverty, and the environment. (3 fish)

Value

$35/family; $12 per person. Under 7 free. The family rate has put the smallest dent in Fish Daddy’s family wallet this Fish Fry Lent, but a repeat performance here won’t come until 2017. Be sure to check the listings at http://www.thcatholicspirit.com early in Lent to make sure you don’t miss out on that once-a-Lent fish fry. (3 fish)

St. Edward’s 9401 Nesbitt Ave S., Bloomington 952-835-7101. http://stedwardschurch.org

Want Fish Daddy to visit your parish? E-mail CatholicSpirit@archspm.org.

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Fish Daddy reviews Holy Cross’ fish fry

February 16, 2016

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Fish Daddy's plate at Holy Cross' Lenten fish fry. Courtesy Fish Daddy

Fish Daddy’s plate at Holy Cross’ Lenten fish fry. Courtesy Fish Daddy

Catholic Hotdish welcomes Fish Daddy, who visits some of the hot spots in the Twin Cities for Lenten fish fries. He’s looking at more than the fish — it’s the fellowship, the friendliness and faith that makes this Catholic Lenten tradition shine. Here’s an overview of what you’ll find in Fish Daddy’s column during Lent:

Call me the banquet guest from Luke 14: 7-14. Fish Daddy visits a Lenten fish fry every Friday, delivering a spirited review of a parish or Catholic association Fish Fry. Fish Daddy looks at what makes a fish fry special:

Fish

Fish is the dish. And good fish makes a gathering special. I’ll tell you how I liked it, what came with it on the plate, and how it fills the stomach. Let’s get one thing straight from the start. Fish Sticks does not get you kicked off the island (in Fish Daddy’s eyes, the island is not the place to be anyways — it’s the deep sea), but it does put you up against some fairly strong competition and years of experience in Twin Cities fish fries.

Service

Any good Catholic knows service is the heart of our calling as Christians. Serving fish sticks on a paper plate won’t win you any Julia Child awards, but good service with a smile, and volunteer spirit of the parish bring your servant leadership to the fore in this category.

Fishers of Men

It takes effort to put on a good fish fry, but those who maintain the Lenten spirit of devotion with Lenten devotionals, rosaries, or other faith manifestations during or around the Fish Fry are all that really matters in the Catholic life. Matthew 4:19 says it best.

Value

This is our catch-all area for how we measure the less tangible. Covers items like price, ambience, parking, convenience, bingo or other fundraisers during Lent, or other items — that special something the organization brings to the table.

Want Fish Daddy to visit your parish? E-mail CatholicSpirit@archspm.org.

Feb 12—Holy Cross

Finding Holy Cross in the heart of Nordeast was the easy part. The hard part was standing in line inside Kolbe Center (just east of the church itself) behind dozens, with the aroma of a fresh fish fry hanging in the air. The parish volunteers kept the line moving quickly. Pastor Glen Jensen was greeting everyone in the line, with his trademark cup of tea, bringing the faithful hungry together in spirit. The Kolbe Center at Holy Cross seats about 300, and they needed all 20 tables for the inaugural Lenten Friday weekend.

Fish

Holy Cross served up a heaping plate of fish dinner — two fish (a bit pressed and formed, but tasty), an excellent baked potato, cole slaw with a tang of horseradish, and a side of mac and cheese and a dinner roll. A fine substitute for the baker was two tong-fuls of seasoned French fries. All served on a Nordeast-style plate, with my choice of condiments, and a cookie, along with coffee or water. Pop was available for a small charge, and beer and wine was available for a free will offering. (Two Fish)

Service

Servers were constantly circulating, offering refills on coffee or second helpings. Short on time? Holy Cross volunteers were more than willing to put together a to-go platter for the same price as sit-down. With tables for 10, not only did your server chat you up, your tablemates did as well. (Four Fish)

Fishers of people

Holy Cross parish is replete with Lenten devotions, from their Adoration chapel to Friday Stations of the Cross (6 p.m. for English and 7 p.m. for Polish). In addition to their weekly fish fries through Lent, they also feature soup suppers on Wednesdays, as well as a Cana Dinner. (Four Fish)

Value

Adults $10, Under 12 $2. (Three Fish)

Details

Holy Cross, 17th Ave and 4th St. NE, Minneapolis. Fish fries Feb. 12, 19 and 26, and March 4, 11 and 18. http://www.ourholycross.org.

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Why no meat on Fridays in Lent?

March 11, 2011

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Catholics abstain from flesh meat on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday and the Fridays in Lent.

Abstinence is one of our oldest Christian traditions.

“From the first century, the day of the crucifixion has been traditionally observed as a day of abstaining from flesh meat (‘black fast’) to honor Christ who sacrificed his flesh on a Friday,” according to “The Catholic Source Book.”

Written up as law

Up until 1966, church law prohibited meat on all Fridays throughout the entire year. The new law was promulgated in 1983 in the revised Code of Canon Law, which states: “Abstinence [is] to be observed on Ash Wednesday and on the Friday of the Passion and Death of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Canon 1251).

“All persons who have completed their fourteenth year are bound by the law of abstinence” (Canon 1252).

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops extended this law to include all Fridays in Lent.

Since Jesus sacrificed his flesh for us on Good Friday, we refrain from eating flesh meat in his honor on Fridays. Flesh meat included the meat of mammals and poultry, and the main foods that come under this heading are beef and pork, chicken and turkey. While flesh is prohibited, the non-flesh products of these animals are not (like milk, cheese, butter and eggs).

Fish do not belong to the flesh meat category. The Latin word for meat, “caro,” from which we get English words like “carnivore” and “carnivorous,” applies strictly to flesh meat and has never been understood to include fish.

Furthermore, in former times, flesh meat was more expensive, eaten only occasionally and associated with feasting and rejoicing; whereas fish was cheap, eaten more often and not associated with celebrations.

Abstinence is a form of penance. Penance expresses sorrow and contrition for our wrongdoing, indicates our intension to turn away from sin and turn back to God, and makes reparation for our sins. It helps to cancel the debt and pay the penalties incurred by our transgressions.

Abstinence is a form of asceticism, the practice of self-denial to grow in holiness. Jesus asks his disciples to deny themselves and take up their cross (Matthew 16:24).

Abstinence is a sober way to practice simplicity and austerity, to deny the cravings of our bodies to honor Jesus who practiced the ultimate form of self-denial when he gave his body for us on the cross.

Thus, to give up flesh meat on Fridays, only to feast on lobster tail or Alaskan king crab, is to defeat the ascetical purpose of abstinence. Less is more!

There are countless options for simple Friday meatless dinners: pancakes, waffles, soup and rolls, chipped tuna on toast, macaroni and cheese, fried egg sandwiches, grilled cheese sandwiches, cheese pizza and, of course, fish.

Video: Why no meat on Fridays during Lent?

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It’s Fish Fry Friday!

March 11, 2011

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Mmm...

One of the most cherished Catholic customs is upon us again – no, not bingo – the Friday Fish Fry.

The online listings are here. This year’s round-up includes a couple different takes on the penitential practice – an Enchilada dinner at Our Lady of Guadalupe and a Lebanese Lenten Dinner at Holy Family Maronite Church.

Last year, we made a video spotlighting the popular Fish Fry at St. Albert the Great…

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Bon Appétit!

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