Tag Archives: Eerdmans Books for Young Readers

Lessons for young in biography of famous author

November 18, 2014

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coverThe adventurous, creative life of French writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry ended much too soon during World War II, yet it was a life that gives credence to the saying “short but sweet.”

Writer and illustrator Bimba Landmann captures both sentiments in graceful words and thoughtful artwork in her biography of the author of “The Little Prince.”

Aimed at young people age 7 and up, this Eerdmanns Book for Young Readers is a history lesson — and maybe an art and literature lesson, too — in just 34 pages.

Imaginative drawings on each page force the eye to spend as much time on them as on the text, and the text is superb, filled with picturesque, near-poetic phrases.

They bring little Antoine from his dreamy early life through adult adventures on four continents, and leave one with the feeling they know this amazing man whose vivid spirit brought the world one of its great stories.

Grandparents, if there’s a book lover in the family, this would make a wonderful gift.

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Life’s mysteries, from another point of view

October 15, 2014

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“God should hang up a mailbox for people to send questions and complaints.”

When your world turns upside down, it may pay to look at it that way.
Young Anna does just that — and takes her grieving father along — in the subtly worded and creatively illustrated “Anna’s Heaven.”
Anna coverTranslated by Don Bartlett from the Norwegian, this picture-heavy and text-terse Eerdman’s Book for Young Readers would make for an interesting parent-child reading time, especially in households dealing with the death of a loved one.
The dialogue between father and daughter mixes the realistic and magical, often terrific role modeling for parents trying to cope with the curveballs life throws.
Stain Hole, both author and illustrator, includes interesting questioning of the role God plays in life’s mysteries.
“Why can’t he who knows everything, who can pull and push and turn over clouds and waves and planets — why can’t he invent something to turn bad into good?” Anna says.
“God should hang up a mailbox for people to send questions and complaints,” Dad answers.
Take this journey to the upside-down world. Oh, and look for Elvis and Pablo Picasso in Anna’s version of the hereafter.

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A gift book for budding readers and writers

September 22, 2014

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Roget coverLovers of good writing, those who chew on words, savor their sounds, relish the way they strike pictures in the mind or prompt emotions, those are the kind of people who will want to pick up “The Right Word” and buy it for all the young readers and writers they know.

Author Jen Bryant’s bright-and-tight prose fits well with this young person’s version of a biography of Peter Mark Roget, whose famous thesaurus, first printed in 1852, continues to be updated and published more than a century and a half later. It’s a life story worth knowing.

And Melissa Sweet’s creative, playful illustrations make for just as good reading as she pulls in definition after definition from Roget’s lists of the synonyms for words. When young Peter tells his mother he is “fine,” for example, Sweet’s silhouetted caricature of the boy considers if “fine” is the right word for how he feels, and bubble thoughts including possible options like “glad,” “cheerful,” “well,” “dandy,” “never better,” “splendid,” “middling,” “nice” and “happy as the day is long.”

This Eerdmans Book for Young readers is a splendid way to introduce anyone age seven and up to one of the writing world’s riches.

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So much to be thankful for

August 19, 2014

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thank you god coverQuick, list all the things for which you’d like to thank God.

I’ll bet you haven’t come up with as many as are in the new children’s book, “Thank You, God.”

Author J. Bradley Wigger lists in 26 pages more things for which we ought to be grateful for than most parents are likely to come up with as they pray with their young ones.

And, with typical family scenes colorfully illustrating the prayer-like text with all kinds of details, “Thank You, God” will keep the interest of young people as well, thanks to the artistry of Jago.

Just published in August, this is an imprint of Eerdmans Books for Young Readers.

 

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Story of Jesus perfect for 4-to-8 year olds

May 12, 2014

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Jesus coverLittle children run to Jesus on the cover of this Eerdmans Book for Young Readers, a wonderful image to draw the target age group — 4-to-8 years — into the story of Jesus’ life.
Benedictine Anselm Grün’s retelling of Gospel events is true to Catholic teaching, from the visitation through the nativity and more than a half-dozen highlights of New Testament stories up through Jesus’ death and resurrection.
The translation by Laura Watkinson keeps the language simple and age-appropriate, and Giuliano Ferri’s colorful artwork adds to the storytelling, bringing to life the calling of the disciples, for example, the stories of the multiplication of the loaves and fishes, the Prodigal Son, and the Last Supper.
Parents and teachers will find “Jesus” an excellent choice reading to children in a home schooling setting or early faith formation.

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‘Brother Hugo and the Bear’: cute and informative

May 8, 2014

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brother hugo and the bearAuthor Katy Beebe has crafted a cute story from a sliver of what may or may not be a true anecdote from the 12th century. Did a bear really devour much of one monastery’s copy of St. Augustine’s letters to St. Jerome?

Beebe’s fictional Brother Hugo gets the task of replacing it, and a good chunk of the tale illustrates how manuscripts were created by the monks in those monasteries in the Middle Ages.

Illustrates is the perfect word, too, because artist S.D. Schindler’s superb use of the style of those medieval illuminators adds a whimsical period touch that puts the story into the proper historical timeframe.

This is not just a good tale for young readers but an educational one as well.

There’s church and human history embedded in the Eerdmans book, with salutes to those ancient monasteries, the Benedictine’s Cluny and the Cistercian’s La Grande Chartreuse, and even a glossary that includes both church and manuscript making vocabularies.

What a nice idea, and nicely done.

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