Are Stieg Larsson’s novels really that good?

July 12, 2010

Bobz Book Reviews

I’m behind the curve in getting to Stieg Larsson’s trilogy, but with beach time on vacation last week I finally got around to reading “The Girls with the Dragon Tattoo.”

It’s a page-turner, for sure, with unique story lines and original characters, pretty bloody and sexually wierd, demented in fact, promiscuous assuredly. But I had to keep reading, if only to see if my guesses to solve the mystery were on target.

Although I’ve read better books, on a 10-point scale the first book in the series is probably an 8. That’s better than average, and must have been because I went out and picked up book No. 2 — and the current bestseller — “The Girl Who Played With Fire.”

I’d love to know what others who’ve read any of Larsson’s works think.

One question that has popped up in book No. 1 and already in book No. 2 that I’m not even 100 pages into: Do the main characters have to have sex with everyone they meet? Like right away, too? — bz

About Bob Zyskowski

Bob is the Client Products Manager for the Communications Office of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. A 42-year veteran of the Catholic Press, he is the former Associate Publisher of The Catholic Spirit. You can follow him on twitter or email him at zyskowskir@archspm.org.

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  • Concerned Catholic

    One question that has popped up in book No. 1 and already in book No. 2 that I’m not even 100 pages into: Do the main characters have to have sex with everyone they meet? Like right away, too?

    Anybody that would even consider writing a book review of one of these books should ask himself the question: As a faithful Catholic, is this really a book I should be reading because it is morally perverted?

    Will you post this comment Bob? Are you morally perverted and is that why you are asking the questions above? Would Jesus enjoy this book? People like you do serious damage to our faith.

  • Bob Zyskowski

    Wow. I’d love to know the thoughts of others about this review, about what books deserve to be reviewed — or even read — and about the comment by “Concerned Catholic.”

    I felt a bit behind the curve on the Stieg Larsson novels, not reading them until the cheaper paperback versions came out. They’d already been on the bestseller lists for quite a while, and when that many people all over the world are reading something it seems appropriate that a Catholic reviewer find out why.

    Frankly, I thought my review gave folks a pretty good idea of what to expect from Larsson’s books when I wrote “pretty bloody and sexually wierd, demented in fact, promiscuous assuredly.”

    I wrote that the mystery kept me reading, but I also questioned the need for the sexual titilation in the review, writing, “Do the main characters have to have sex with everyone they meet? Like right away, too?”

    I would have thought that that question and the earlier description of the content would have pretty well expressed my personal beliefs.

    But again, I’m interested in others’ thoughts about what’s appropriate to read – for anyone — and what’s appropriatefor a Catholic reviewer to comment on.

    I hope the posting of “Concerned Catholic” comment answer his or her question about whether or not I will post his or her comment. Those other questions? Really? “Concerned Catholic” can make that kind of judgment about a person from reading one review?

    All the previous reviews are accessible. Does the body of my work say I’m morally perverse and a detriment to the faith? Really?